Researchers

As part of its Faculty Fellows Program, SyracuseCoE offers support to faculty researchers at Syracuse University, SUNY-ESF, and other universities in SyracuseCoE’s core focus areas: clean and renewable energy, indoor environmental quality, and water resources. The following faculty members have been closely engaged in research with SyracuseCoE and have been designated as Faculty Fellows.
THE 2018 REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS IS NOW CLOSED.

The awards were made possible by funding to support SyracuseCoE activities awarded by Empire State Development’s Division of Science, Technology and Innovation (NYSTAR). Read more about the 2017 SyracuseCoE Faculty Fellows on our news page.


JEONGMIN AHN

Associate Professor, College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Advanced energy conversions, fuel cells, batteries, combustion, thermal management, PowerMEMS

 

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Ahn is working on an innovative flame-assisted fuel cell (FFC) concept with specific applications in residential space and domestic hot water heating. With SyracuseCoE support, his lab will work on rich-burn, quick-mix, lean-burn (RQL) combustor with FFC integrated that generates electrical power and has the potential for significant reductions in NOx formation. 
Select 2017 SyracuseCoE Projects
Prof. Ahn will collaborate with Prof. Akih-Kumgeh to develop cost-effective and energetically efficient ways of converting bio- and fossil fuels to hydrogen-rich fuels needed for fuel cell systems. Prof. Ahn will focus on evaluating the performance of fuel cell systems fueled by hydrogen-rich gases with some hydrocarbon impurities.

BEN AKIH-KUMGEH

Assistant Professor, College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Combustion physics and chemistry, fuel technology, thermodynamic analysis of energy systems

 

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Akih-Kumgeh will be conducting preliminary studies on laser absorption diagnostics of ignition and pyrolysis kinetics of a class of biofuels. These studies will be conducted at his lab located at SyracuseCoE Headquarters. Additionally, with SyracuseCoE support, three students from Professor Akih-Kumgeh’s lab attended the 2016 Princeton Combustion Summer School.
Select 2017 SyracuseCoE Projects
Prof. Akih-Kumgeh will collaborate with Prof. Ahn to develop cost-effective and energetically efficient ways of converting bio- and fossil fuels to hydrogen-rich fuels needed for fuel cell systems. Prof. Akih-Kumgeh will focus on establishing the controlling gas-phase chemical kinetics using a shock tube reactor.
Select 2018 SyracuseCoE Projects
This project explores the use of biodiesel to enhance the ignition behavior of gasoline for a cleaner and more efficient engine concept known as the Advanced Compression Ignition engine. It uses shock tube ignition experiments and quantum chemical calculations to establish a detailed chemical kinetic model for engine design analysis.

 AMBER BARTOSH

Assistant Professor, School of Architecture, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Resilient architecture, integrated façade systems, and responsive environment simulation via virtual and augmented reality

 

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Bartosh is working on a model to virtually design interior environments using a shape memory polymer integrated façade system which will control the daylighting, solar gain, glare, and thermal comfort without electricity. The virtual reality technology allows for the visualization at full-scale of both the system and the space beyond and allows users to “move” within the environment to dynamically experience daylight changes, shadows, and “see” thermal changes in response to variations in the facade triggered by temperature differentials.

Tristan Brown

 TRISTAN BROWN

Assistant Professor, Forest and Natural Resources Management, SUNY ESF

Focus Area: Sustainable energy law & policy, Bioenergy systems analysis, Techno-economic analysis, Climate policy
 

 

 

Select 2018 SyracuseCoE Projects
The project will quantify the ability of three individual renewable energy pathways and two additional combined pathway scenarios to maximize the energy productivity of land in southeastern New York and replicate the electricity supply profile of the Indian Point nuclear plant. The broader goal of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of the stacked energy concept of pathway combinations on the same land and assess the feasibility of these individual and combined pathways in preparation for integrated economic-environmental assessments to be conducted in the future.

 BILJANA BUJANOVIC

Associate Professor, Paper and Bioprocess Engineering, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Focus Area: Lignocellulosics in pulp, paper, and biorefinery industry. Lignin isolation, characterization, and valorization.

 

 

Select 2017 SyracuseCoE Projects
Dr. Bujanovic will collaborate with Prof. Stipanovic to improve methods of analysis of lignins recovered from different biorefinery streams; hot-water extracts of lignocellulosic biomass (Angiosperms). With the goal of increasing lignin purity and uniformity, different fractionation procedures will also be explored. Protocols for purification and characterization of biorefinery lignin will be suggested to open pathways for lignin use in the production of improved fuel pellets and/or activated carbon.

 

DON CARR

Professor, College of Visual + Performing Arts, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Biomimicry, Biophilia

 

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Carr is using biomimicry to inform the design of products, systems, and the built environment. Currently he is working to establish the Biomimicry Northern Forest network. The establishment of this network will allow for a series of biomimicry events and other education opportunities with partner institutions.

 

DAVID CHANDLER

Associate Professor, College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Hydrology, climate change, green infrastructure, sustainable development

 

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Chandler is designing microelectronic sensors that will be used to monitor hydrologic systems in real time. The sensors will be installed at the SyracuseCoE Headquarters, Save the Rain infrastructure, and a remote watershed. Information on the sensor system was presented at the Ecohydrology Chapman Conference in June 2016. This project builds on prior efforts to monitor green infrastructure in Syracuse.

 

HAMID DALIR

Associate Professor, College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Stress, modal and thermal analysis; Computational mechanics; Multi-disciplinary design optimization; Composite materials and damage mechanics; Multi-scale modeling and material characterization; Material constitutive relations and modeling

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Dr. Dalir’s research interests have revolved around different topics in the area of mechanical and aerospace engineering. His primary research interests are within the general area of Solid Mechanics. He is currently performing research on developing weight optimization strategies for the mechanical and aerospace structures to be light and consequently flexible, while avoiding structural instabilities. In his research as a SyracuseCoE Faculty Fellow, Professor Dalir is establishing a new technique to model the dynamic behavior of the flexible structures. The newly developed distributed-lumped modeling technique will be more accurate and reduce computational time of industrial models. Such techniques can advance the development of light-weight, energy-efficient mechanical and aerospace structures.


 

THONG DANG

Professor, College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Fluid Mechanics, aerodynamics, propulsion, turbomachine, energy and indoor environmental quality

 

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Dang is conducting research on low-speed fan aerodynamics. Many industries require fans for system cooling, automotive air circulation, and environmental control systems and these fans are often inefficient and loud. Throughout the project, fans will be tested with the goal of making them more energy efficient and reducing noise pollution.

 

CLIFF DAVIDSON

Thomas C. and Colleen L. Wilmot Professor of Engineering, Environmental Engineering Program Director, College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Factors influencing municipal government decisions to adopt or reject green infrastructure for storm water management; monitoring the performance of green infrastructure; deposition of atmospheric particles onto urban hardscape such as building roofs.

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Davidson is studying the performance of the Green Roof at the Oncenter in Syracuse, NY. This research is intended to improve our understanding of the performance of Green Infrastructure (GI), and to explore the diffusion of GI technologies around the country. The results will be used in the formation of a website to assist local and national efforts in GI. The project will also enable the use of real-world data in K-12 classrooms and undergraduate courses to further student understanding of the hydrologic cycle and the environment in general.

 

JASON DEDRICK 

Professor, School of Information Studies, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Smart grid adoption by electric utilities, economic impacts and job creation in the wind energy industry

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Dedrick is analyzing data on household electricity use to model the impacts of different market structures, and will test those models empirically. These market structures include programs such as peak rebates and time-of-use pricing that could maximize the use of renewable energy or minimize carbon emissions, without greatly increasing customers’ electricity bills or threatening grid stability. Professor Dedrick’s model could be very useful to that state as New York is leading the transition to distributed energy markets at the retail level with policies that envision the role of utilities as distributed energy platforms.
Select 2017 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Dedrick’s 2017 Faculty Fellows project focuses on the development focuses on the development of an urban building energy model to simulate, test, and visualize future scenarios and strategies in order to: 1) support clean and resilient functioning of the electric grid; 2) minimize energy by buildings while improving occupant comfort; 3) match external energy resources with building energy demand. The integration of energy datasets and visualization methods enable the design, testing, and identification of opportunities for energy conservation, production, and architectural and urban planning design strategies and guidelines for clean and renewable energy.
Select 2018 SyracuseCoE Projects
Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Dedrick’s current research is developing an interactive energy dashboard for visualizing and managing electricity use at the individual and community levels. The dashboard will be a critical tool in the development of community energy programs that incorporate renewables, storage and demand response, creating economic value and improving the environment.

Susan Dieterlen

 

SUSAN DIETERLEN

Research Assistant Professor, School of Architecture, Syracuse University (2015-2016)

Focus Area: People in urban environments, postindustrial cities, economic transformation

 

 

 

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Neighborhood Microgrids: Replicability and Revitalization,” an investigation of the potential for community microgrids to support urban revitalization efforts across Upstate New York. View the final report.

Charles Driscoll

 

CHARLES DRISCOLL

University Professor of Environmental Systems and Distinguished Professor, College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Aquatic chemistry, biogeochemistry, climate change science and engineering, ecosystem restoration, stormwater management

 

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Driscoll will be studying the recovery of surface waters to long-term decreases in atmospheric deposition. He is conducting a synthesis of long-term surface water chemistry trends from ~100 watershed sites from Tennessee to Maine to examine the extent and rate of recovery from acid deposition.  Sites examined will include watersheds from the Adirondack and Catskill regions of New York, areas heavily impacted by acid deposition.
Select 2017 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Driscoll will conduct this Faculty Fellows project in two phases. Diurnal and seasonal patterns in atmospheric mercury concentrations of the SyracuseCoE will be evaluated prior and after brownfield restoration. Analysis of atmospheric deposition of major elements, nutrients and trace metals will be conducted in downtown Syracuse and compared to a rural reference site.
Select 2018 SyracuseCoE Projects
This project will be conducted in three phases. Analysis of wet-only and bulk deposition of major elements, nutrients and trace metals will be conducted in downtown Syracuse at the CoE and compared to a rural reference site. We will supplement these analyses by establishing five additional sites in the city of Syracuse to evaluate spatial variability in atmospheric deposition through measurements of bulk deposition and throughfall. We will also measure the quantity and chemistry of drainage from the CoE green roof and compare the results with current values of atmospheric deposition and historical measurements of the green roof to quantify its hydrologic and biogeochemical function and how it has changed since its installation. Finally, we will make flux measurements of carbon dioxide and methane from soil at the CoE and the five spatial sites in the City of Syracuse. This research will involve undergraduate training and research. Funding is also requested to present results at a professional meeting.

Melissa Green

 

MARIE-ODILE FORTIER

Assistant Professor, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Merced

Focus Area: Life cycle assessment (LCA) methodology development; Modeling energy systems; Geographic resource demand analysis; Deployment of sustainable technologies

 

 

Select 2018 SyracuseCoE Projects
The project will quantify the ability of three individual renewable energy pathways and two additional combined pathway scenarios to maximize the energy productivity of land in southeastern New York and replicate the electricity supply profile of the Indian Point nuclear plant. The broader goal of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of the stacked energy concept of pathway combinations on the same land and assess the feasibility of these individual and combined pathways in preparation for integrated economic-environmental assessments to be conducted in the future.

Melissa Green

 

MELISSA GREEN

Assistant Professor, College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Biological fluid mechanics (specifically fish swimming), fluid structure interactions, vortex dynamics, turbulence, turbulent combustions

 

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Green’s research focuses on complex 3D vortex structures, and how they are generated when flow interacts with stationary or articulated surfaces. As a Faculty Fellow, Professor Green is testing a new technique for fluid dynamic data visualization using the commercial virtual reality headset to explore three-dimensional data sets. She will use this tool for community engagement, particularly with K-12 students who visit the SyracuseCoE Headquarter. The use of this technology provides a new way to view three-dimensional data sets and creates an avenue for collaboration with Prof. Krietemeyer and Prof. Bartosh in the School of Architecture.

GREGORY HOKE

Assistant Professor, College of Arts and Sciences, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Tectonic geomorphology, interactions between landscapes, climate and tectonics, isotopic records of terrestrial surface conditions

 

 

 

Select 2017 SyracuseCoE Projects
For this project, the PIs will observe how dissolved methane concentrations (i.e. natural gas) change through time in domestic wells in the southern tier of New York – a region that overlies the Marcellus Shale. Natural methane occurrence is fairly common in the area. Better characterization of natural methane occurrence will result in more accurate assessment of potential methane contamination due to hydraulic fracturing in the Marcellus region.

Ian Holsein

 

IAN HOSEIN

Assistant Professor, College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Materials Synthesis and Processing, Sustainable Energy Production and Storage, Environmental Remediation and Water Resource Protection, Stimuli-Responsive and Smart Materials

 

 

 

Select 2018 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Hosein is working on the synthesis and testing of novel solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) materials for ion-based batteries, with a focus on increased power delivery, lower cost, and environmental safety. With SyracuseCoE support, his lab will advance SPE functionality and performance towards rechargeable calcium-ion based batteries.

Chris Johnson

 

CHRIS JOHNSON

Professor, College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Soil chemistry, biogeochemical processes in terrestrial ecosystems, chemistry of natural organic matter, trace metals in the environment

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Johnson is conducting research on biogeochemical processes in forest ecosystems that were historically impacted by acid rain. He is analyzing soils from 25 watersheds in the Catskill Mountain region of New York for elemental content. Data from those analyses, along with measurements of stream water chemistry and precipitation chemistry will be used to estimate the release of Ca, Mg, K, Na and Si from soil minerals in these watersheds. This project will help to create a more holistic view of forest ecosystem structure and function with respect to water quality protection.

Christa Kelleher

 

CHRISTA KELLEHER

Assistant Professor, College of Arts and Sciences & College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Hydrology, water quality, environmental modelling, landscape analysis

 

 

 

Select 2017 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Kelleher will be investigating longitudinal patterns of stream temperature and how they change across different levels of streamflow along Onondaga Creek. With Syracuse CoE support, she will be performing this survey using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), alongside the help of the Center for Advanced Systems and Engineering (CASE) Institute and a graduate and undergraduate student.

Michael Kelleher

 

MIKE KELLEHER

Emeritus Research Associates, Forest and Natural Resources Management, SUNY ESF

Focus Area: Sustainable technologies, energy resources, markets, financial analysis, and decision-making
 

 

 

Select 2018 SyracuseCoE Projects
The project will quantify the ability of three individual renewable energy pathways and two additional combined pathway scenarios to maximize the energy productivity of land in southeastern New York and replicate the electricity supply profile of the Indian Point nuclear plant. The broader goal of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of the stacked energy concept of pathway combinations on the same land and assess the feasibility of these individual and combined pathways in preparation for integrated economic-environmental assessments to be conducted in the future.

Ezzat Khalifa

 

H. EZZAT KHALIFA

NYSTAR Distinguished Professor, College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Personalized environmental control systems, transport in microenvironments, distributed energy-efficient control of indoor environments, cooling and energy supply systems for high-efficiency data centers

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Khalifa is examining improving the efficiency of data centers through subzero data center chip cooling. In the research that was primarily supported by NYSERDA, Professor Khalifa is developing a parametric analytical model as well as an hour-by-hour annual energy simulation model of a power and refrigeration cascade system (PARCS) that has the potential to realize the benefits of low-temperature operation of the computer chips while decreasing the overall power consumption of the servers and their conventional cooling infrastructure.

Bess Krietemeyer1

 

BESS KRIETEMEYER

Assistant Professor, School of Architecture, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Urban energy visualization and design decision-making tools; building envelope technologies and simulations for human interaction and design; virtual and augmented reality energy simulations

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Krietemeyer has been conducting research in hybrid-reality visualization tools within the Interactive Design and Visualization Lab (IDVL) at the SyracuseCoE Headquarters. As a Faculty Fellow, Professor Krietemeyer is expanding the research to include simulation of fluid dynamics at the urban scale. The broader aims are to extend the visualization capacity of current software tools being developed to create a link with CFD analysis software, and to make the IDVL more applicable to other SyracuseCoE labs and faculty.
Select 2017 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Krietemeyer’s current research focuses on the development of an urban building energy model to simulate, test, and visualize future scenarios and strategies  in order to: 1) support clean and resilient functioning of the electric grid; 2) minimize energy by buildings while improving occupant comfort; 3) match external energy resources with building energy demand. The integration of energy datasets and visualization methods enable the design, testing, and identification of opportunities for energy conservation, production, and architectural and urban planning design strategies and guidelines for clean and renewable energy. 
Select 2018 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Krietemeyer’s current research is developing an interactive energy dashboard for visualizing and managing electricity use at the individual and community levels. The dashboard will be a critical tool in the development of community energy programs that incorporate renewables, storage and demand response, creating economic value and improving the environment.

Laura Lautz1

 

LAURA LAUTZ

Associate Professor, College of Arts and Sciences, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Hydrology, water quality, movement through watersheds, exchange of water between surface and subsurface environments

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Lautz has been leading Project SWIFT, which has been engaged in a groundwater monitoring campaign in 5 counties of southern NY, across the state border from the highest density HVHF shale gas production areas of northeastern PA. Professor Lautz is currently using existing and published datasets in an effort to create a classification and regression tree model that will predict methane occurrence and be readily interpreted into graphical methods. This model will then be linked to a conceptual model of the hydrogeologic processes driving methane and fluid migration in shallow groundwater in areas of interest to understand the processes linked to natural methane occurrence.
Select 2017 SyracuseCoE Projects

For this project, the PIs will observe how dissolved methane concentrations (i.e. natural gas) change through time in domestic wells in the southern tier of New York – a region that overlies the Marcellus Shale. Natural methane occurrence is fairly common in the area. Better characterization of natural methane occurrence will result in more accurate assessment of potential methane contamination due to hydraulic fracturing in the Marcellus region.


Zunli Lu

 ZUNLI LU

Assistant Professor, Earth Sciences, College of Arts and Sciences, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Fresh water quality, hydrological tracers, climate change, geochemistry

 

Select 2017 SyracuseCoE Projects
For this project, the PIs will observe how dissolved methane concentrations (i.e. natural gas) change through time in domestic wells in the southern tier of New York – a region that overlies the Marcellus Shale. Natural methane occurrence is fairly common in the area. Better characterization of natural methane occurrence will result in more accurate assessment of potential methane contamination due to hydraulic fracturing in the Marcellus region.

RObert Malmsheimer

 ROBERT MALSMSHEIMER

Professor, SUNY ESF

Focus Area: Land-use policies, energy policy
 

Select 2018 SyracuseCoE Projects
The project will quantify the ability of three individual renewable energy pathways and two additional combined pathway scenarios to maximize the energy productivity of land in southeastern New York and replicate the electricity supply profile of the Indian Point nuclear plant. The broader goal of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of the stacked energy concept of pathway combinations on the same land and assess the feasibility of these individual and combined pathways in preparation for integrated economic-environmental assessments to be conducted in the future.

 

SHALABH MAROO

Assistant Professor, College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Energy & thermal management, water desalination and filtration, and bio-mechanical systems

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Maroo is conducting research on the effect of surfactants on pool boiling for cooling surfaces.  Professor Maroo is working to visualize and study the pool boiling at a microscopic level using a laser and high-speed camera to more thoroughly understand the impact of surfactants on pool boiling. Enhancement in boiling heat transfer can lead to the more efficient use of energy in boiling applications.

Todd Moss

TODD MOSS 

Assistant Professor of Entrepreneurship, Faculty Director and Sustainable Enterprise Partnership,
Whitman School of Management, Syracuse University

Focus Area: The intersection of entrepreneurship, innovation, and social responsibility, and crowdfunding and the various types of value creation as pursued by microenterprises

 

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
The overall goal of Professor Moss’s project is to study antecedents and outcomes of sustainable entrepreneurship in developing countries, which are typically the most vulnerable to environmental challenges. Specifically, Professor Moss will analyze loans to small businesses to see the effect on economic, social, and environmental factors.

Dawkwon Park1

 

DAEKWON PARK

Assistant Professor, School of Architecture, Syracuse University

Focus Area: The intersection of design, material technology, and environmental science and its impact on the built environment

 

 

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Park is currently working on a project to develop a compact modular habitat prototype using retired shipping containers. The key strategies that will be utilized are flexible planning (for both modules and assembly) to overcome the limited module size; and high-performance envelope and services design for minimum environmental footprint and maximum indoor environmental quality. This research can potentially serve as a platform for integrating the wide range of research conducted at SyracuseCoE for creating affordable, pleasant, and compact habitats with low environmental footprint.
Select 2017 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Park’s current research focuses on developing advanced building envelope systems for thermal and structural performance. The key research projects for the 2017 Faculty Fellows include: 1) the design and optimization of the building envelope air channels and cavities for adaptive thermal control; 2) the highly-customizable and ultra-lightweight joints for building envelope structures using topology optimization and 3d printed composites; and 3) the thermal design of masonry blocks (e.g. ceramic, concrete, gypsum) for thermal performance augmentation.

Tarek Rakha

 

TAREK RAKHA

Assistant Professor, School of Architecture, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Sustainable urban mobility, daylighting and energy in buildings and unmanned aerial vehicles for building performance inspection

 

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Rakha is leading the Performative Praxis Lab (PPL), which aims to influence sustainable practices in architecture and urban design. Projects include assessing sustainable transportation and outdoor thermal comfort in the City of Syracuse, market adoption of LEED residential buildings in the US, performance of electrochromic glazing in office environments and using drones in building performance inspection.
Select 2017 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Rakha’s 2017 Faculty Fellows project focuses on the development focuses on the development of an urban building energy model to simulate, test, and visualize future scenarios and strategies in order to: 1) support clean and resilient functioning of the electric grid; 2) minimize energy by buildings while improving occupant comfort; 3) match external energy resources with building energy demand. The integration of energy datasets and visualization methods enable the design, testing, and identification of opportunities for energy conservation, production, and architectural and urban planning design strategies and guidelines for clean and renewable energy.
Select 2018 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Rakha’s current research is developing an interactive energy dashboard for visualizing and managing electricity use at the individual and community levels. The dashboard will be a critical tool in the development of community energy programs that incorporate renewables, storage and demand response, creating economic value and improving the environment.

Suresh-Santanam

 

SURESH SANTANAM

Associate Professor, College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Built environment energy and indoor air quality (IAQ) improvement studies, health effects due to indoor air contaminants, indoor-outdoor contributions to IAQ

 

 

Select 2018 SyracuseCoE Projects
Humidity and moisture level within offices during winter months tend to be low, and is known to lead to physiological effects such as drying of mucous membranes (Pfluger et al., 2010). Prior studies have assessed the potential correlation between low indoor moisture levels and induced sickness (Sundell and Lindvall, 1993; Sato, et al., 2003). In this work, the impact of low relative humidity (corresponding to cold climate winter conditions) on human productivity will be assessed using quantitative techniques for human cognition and performance.

Usha Satish

 

USHA SATISH

Professor, Psychiatry and Behavior Sciences, SUNY Upstate

Focus Area: IAQ, human Factors, productivity, evaluation of cognition, complexity theory, stimulation technology

 

 

 

Select 2018 SyracuseCoE Projects
Humidity and moisture level within offices during winter months tend to be low, and is known to lead to physiological effects such as drying of mucous membranes (Pfluger et al., 2010). Prior studies have assessed the potential correlation between low indoor moisture levels and induced sickness (Sundell and Lindvall, 1993; Sato, et al., 2003). In this work, the impact of low relative humidity (corresponding to cold climate winter conditions) on human productivity will be assessed using quantitative techniques for human cognition and performance.

Fred Schlereth

 

FRED SCHLERETH

Associate Research Professor, College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Instrumentation, FPGA Applications, Software Defied Radio

 

 

 

Select 2018 SyracuseCoE Projects
The real-time detection and rapid facility systems response to chemical and biological (CB) threat agents is essential to both the protection of building occupants and the maintenance of critical system operations. We propose a unique and transformational strategy to a new sensor approach with the potential for seamless integration with facility systems to form a rapid, robust, accurate and fully integrated environmental and security control systems, based upon our recent technological advances.

James Spencer

 

JAMES SPENCER

Laura J. and L. Douglas Meredith Professor, College of Arts and Sciences, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Inorganic chemistry; organometallic chemistry; materials chemistry and solid state science; new sensor development; forensic science

 

 

 

Select 2018 SyracuseCoE Projects
The real-time detection and rapid facility systems response to chemical and biological (CB) threat agents is essential to both the protection of building occupants and the maintenance of critical system operations. We propose a unique and transformational strategy to a new sensor approach with the potential for seamless integration with facility systems to form a rapid, robust, accurate and fully integrated environmental and security control systems, based upon our recent technological advances.

 

ARTHUR J. STIPANOVIC

Professor, Chemistry, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Focus Area: Conversion of renewable “woody” biomass for the production of fuels, chemicals and biodegradable materials

 

 

Select 2017 SyracuseCoE Projects
In this 2017 Faculty Fellows project, Professor Stipanovic will apply a portfolio of analytical techniques to characterize the lignin materials being produced in biorefinery operations (HR-TGA, DSC, NIR).

SENEM VELIPASALAR

Associate Professor, College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Computer Vision, Video/Image Processing, Embedded Smart Cameras, Multi-camera Multi-object Tracking

 

 

 

Select 2017 SyracuseCoE Projects

Sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency–Energy (ARPA-E), Prof. Velipasalar and SyracuseCoE will work with colleagues to develop a low-cost, high-accuracy sensor platform that accurately detects human presence inside buildings to dramatically reduce energy use in residential settings. The sensor will pair a low-resolution optical camera (which inherently preserves privacy) with an infrared sensor, microphone and low-power processor to understand its surroundings and determine human presence with a goal of reducing HVAC energy usage by 30%.


TIM VOLK

Senior Research Associate, Forest and Natural Resources Management, SUNY ESF

Focus Area: Bio Mass

 

 

 

Select 2018 SyracuseCoE Projects

The project will quantify the ability of three individual renewable energy pathways and two additional combined pathway scenarios to maximize the energy productivity of land in southeastern New York and replicate the electricity supply profile of the Indian Point nuclear plant. The broader goal of the project is to demonstrate the feasibility of the stacked energy concept of pathway combinations on the same land and assess the feasibility of these individual and combined pathways in preparation for integrated economic-environmental assessments to be conducted in the future.


Peter Wilcoxen Portrait

 

PETER WILCOXEN

Professor, Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Climate change, energy policy, environment and development, environmental economics and policy, indoor air quality, international trade and the environment

 

 


Teng Zeng

 

TENG ZENG

Assistant Professor, College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Fate and transformation of emerging organic contaminants, formation and control of disinfection byproducts

 

 

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects

Professor Zeng is studying the source and behavior of nitrosamines, a group of suspected human carcinogens, in urban watersheds. The project will compare the removal of nitrosamines in wastewater treatment plants with different configurations and identify nitrosamine precursor materials within wastewater using high-resolution mass spectrometry. Results from this work will help water utilities understand the fate of nitrosamines and precursors driving their formation in order to meet potential future regulations source and behavior. Specifically, the project will delineate the occurrence and removal of nitrosamines during wastewater treatment, identify major nitrosamine precursor pools within wastewater, and evaluate the impact of water chemistry and pre-treatment techniques on nitrosamine formation during drinking water treatment.

Select 2018 SyracuseCoE Projects

Freshwater harmful algal blooms represent one of the greatest water quality threats in New York. This project will evaluate the tradeoff between algal toxin removal and nitrosamine byproduct formation during drinking water treatment.


Jianshun Zhang

 

JIANSHUN "JENSEN" ZHANG

Professor, College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Focus Area: Material emissions, air purification, indoor air quality, hygrothermal performance of building materials and enclosure systems, and Combined Heat, Air, Moisture and Pollutant Simulations (CHAMPS)

 

 

 

Select 2016 SyracuseCoE Projects
Professor Zhang is developing a model for indoor air quality which will leverage an existing model developed by his research group. The IAQ model is being developed by first completing analyses in small environmental chambers using selected materials and then analyzing a large chamber where an indoor residential space will be mocked. Ultimately, the project will develop indoor air quality design and control strategies for low-energy residential buildings.