Students at SyracuseCoE

Students play an integral role in the success of SyracuseCoE. As part of a student-focused research university we have the privilege to engage a diverse group of students in varying capacities throughout the year. Staff interns, members of the Summer Industry Collaboration Internship Program, and student researchers are just a few of the roles students have at SyracuseCoE to participate in experiential learning and real-world industry collaboration that addresses emerging opportunities and societal needs.


“At SyracuseCoE, I learned how important networking is and going the extra mile and simply saying yes to challenging opportunities. Those challenges led me to bigger and better things every single time.” ~Bryan Morris, Engineering & Computer Science ’16

Current Interns and Researchers

Michael John Garrett

Masters in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

College of Engineering, Syracuse University

Facilities Intern

  1. What have you learned from your internship at SyracuseCoE?
    Working at the CoE has introduced me to the effort involved in completing construction and facilities maintenance projects on campus. I have especially enjoyed talking to the people who work behind the scenes at Syracuse to ensure everything remains operational.
  2. What about SyracuseCoE attracts you most?
    The work environment at CoE is one that fosters learning, so having the ability to see how inputs from various building sensors are utilized to control the systems that keep building occupants comfortable has enhanced my confidence in working with these systems[/su_spoiler]

Mitchell Jones

Bachelor of Arts, Advertising, Mathematics, 2019

S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, College of Arts and Sciences, Syracuse University

Communications Intern

  1. What has been the best part of your experience?
    The people here at SyracuseCoE are a great group. They truly want you to succeed, and everyone is willing to lend a helping hand in order to get the job done. It’s a cheerful and productive work environment that has been a lot of fun to be a part of.
  2. What have you learned so far?
    I have learned a lot, including how to use new programs such as Constant Contact, as well as expanded upon prior skills like WordPress. I am also constantly learning more about the industry and all its current and future promising advances.
  3. How do you envision your future career?
    I know I want to do marketing and communications, maybe in the entertainment or sports fields. I am still somewhat undecided on the specifics, but I’m sure I’ll figure it out along the way.

Justin King

Ph.D. in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 2020

College of Engineering, Syracuse University

Researcher in Flow Visualization Lab

  1. What lab do you work in and who is the leading faculty member?
    I work at the Flow Visualization Lab, which is run by Dr. Melissa Green.
  2. What projects are you currently working on or researching at SyracuseCoE?
    My current research is looking at the fluid mechanics of the wake produced by a bio-inspired pitching panel.
  3. What is the most important thing that you have learned through your research endeavors at SyracuseCoE?
    The most important thing that I have learned through my research at SyracuseCoE is to start any important project or assignment as early as you can. It is much easier to deal with unexpected difficulties and problems when you are ahead of schedule.
  4. How does your research at SyracuseCoE help to advance your academic studies and/or future career path?
    The research that I perform at SyracuseCoE is an integral component of my thesis work. It would be impossible for me to advance my academic studies without my lab at SyracuseCoE.
  5. Do you have any advice for other students in your field?
    Always try to talk with other people in your field. Often times, those people will be able to provide you with a lot of practical insight into your current research.

Former Interns and Researchers

Josh Aviv

Syracuse University School of Information Studies

Web Development Intern, Current President, CEO of SparkCharge

(Picture: RvD IDEA -Summit for Supporting Students Startups Emerging Talk 2015)

  1. Has SyracuseCoE influenced your career path at all?
    Absolutely. Working in a place like SyracuseCoE is different. It’s a different mind-set. They go about things differently. Even just working in a building with a bunch of glass and light coming in, when you go to work in an office building you kind of miss it. Also, working with people there that have such great minds that you can kind of pick if you have an idea, if you’re kind of thinking of something. So, the really driven work ethic they go through at SyracuseCoE does rub off on you. Everything, the building, the people, the work, it all rubs off in some way.
  2. For other students who are in your program, do you have advice for them about getting into the field of entrepreneurship?
    Just jump into it and learn. You’re going to learn so much not only about building a company, but you’re going to learn so much about yourself. You’re going to learn about how much adversity you’re willing to cut through to get a job done, and no matter what company you build, you’re going to run into speed bumps and you’re going to have to figure out how to get over them. College is a great place to think about becoming an entrepreneur because you’re in this “bubble” so to speak. The real-world issues that would apply to the standard person doing the 9-5 don’t really apply to you, especially if you’re an undergrad. So if you’re a college entrepreneur, now’s the time to go for it, now’s the time to do it.
  3. Why would you say students should intern at SyracuseCoE?
    Intern at SyracuseCoE if you want to get a different view of the world, so to speak. This is a part of the university that has different thinking. They’re all about clean tech, renewables, and an alternative energy source. If you want to see and be around the latest and greatest in clean tech, and work on the latest and greatest clean tech projects, then this is the place you need to be. If you have any intentions of working in the clean-tech field, then SyracuseCoE is one you want to work in and where you would want to be.


Lauren Bailey

Bachelor of Science, Public Relations, 2017

S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, Syracuse University

Communications Intern

  1. What did you learn through your internship at SyracuseCoE?
    I have learned about the importance of research and planning for any project, especially within such a niche industry. As a communications intern, it is very important to know how to best reach a target audience, and which terms/tactics to use. I also now know a ton about website development and design.
  2. What was the best part of your experience?
    The best part of my experience was learning more about the environmental and energy systems industry. It was very fascinating to see all of the hard work and dedication that each researcher, student, partner and employee contributes to the industry, as well as how SyracuseCoE helps them with their efforts.
  3. How do you envision your future career?
    In the future, I hope to work for a public relations agency for a few years and then maybe switch to corporate public relations.

Morgan Bulman

Master of Arts in Magazine, Newspaper and Online Journalism, 2017

S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, Syracuse University

Communications Intern

  1. What did you learn through your internship at SyracuseCoE?
    A lot! I now have a greater understanding of what it’s like to work in a CMS system such as WordPress. I’ve also been able to obtain a greater understanding of how much impact one word can have when perfecting a message.
  2. What was the best part of your experience?
    To be able to work in an environment that allows you to leave your desk in order to find the best spot suited for creativity.
  3. How do you envision your future career?
    I’m hoping I’ll be working in either science journalism or doing something at the crossroads of communications and sustainability. I want to be able to raise awareness around environmental issues in a way that is both engaging and interesting for an audience.

Summer El Deeb

Bachelor in Landscape Architecture

State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Building Management Systems Intern

  1. What are you currently doing at SyracuseCoE?
    I currently manage all the drawing records associated with construction of the building. These drawings include: project documents, site photos, submittals, agreements, and contractor documents. I help handle the visual display installations, storage inventories, equipment records, and organize the drawings database for Syracuse. I also help with events and tours as much as I can.
  2. Do you have any advice for students in your field?
    Most students in Landscape Architecture want to design. I feel like you need to study the design and see how the process goes on, instead of going ahead and just being a designer. Studying other people designing is very important. Seeing the process of this building go from a brownfield all the way to a LEED Platinum certified building was wonderful. It was the greatest experience anyone could experience in life.
  3. How do you envision your future career?
    The greatest thing I want to move on to do is manage stormwater. From soil erosion to impacting human health and other stuff, generating places that could help the stormwater filtrate better in the soil before entering the sewer system is something I would love to do.
    .

Ryan Falkenstein-Smith

Ph.D. in the Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering Department

College of Engineering, Syracuse University

Researcher in COMER Lab

  1. What projects did you work on or research while at SyracuseCoE?
    I worked on a number of projects, but focused heavily on an oxygen-transport membrane for carbon capture purposes. Essentially, you use a singular membrane to deliver pure oxygen separated from the surrounding air that delivers to your fuel, and you have a combustion reaction at a higher temperature to capture Co2 and H2O.
  2. How did your research at SyracuseCoE help to advance your academic studies and/or future career path?
    When I started out, my research direction was very focused on fundamental stuff. SyracuseCoE definitely broadened that in terms of application and working with the community, as well as with potential collaborators. Syracuse Center of Excellence’s big thing is about sustainability and a greener tomorrow. My original project was just seeing if this was feasible, this technology, but it became, “can we move this into sustainable technologies?” So really, it broadened my scope in terms of the end user and how to benefit not only just the research community but the general community overall.
  3. Do you have any advice for those who are coming to work in the COMER Lab?
    The Combustion Energy Research Lab has a number of opportunities in fuel cell science and technologies as well as material sciences and combustion sciences. One of the benefits that I learned is it’s not something that will get you to somewhere that you should be, but where you want to be. A lot of researchers that are just starting out may have a general idea of what they want to do, but the one thing that the COMER Lab does is that it expands on what you know, to what you should know, to what you want to know. This is extremely beneficial to becoming a professional researcher, not only in an academic setting but in an industrial setting or a government setting. So, it really prepares you for all of these opportunities that are out there.


Akanksha Kawade

Masters’ of Science in Environmental Engineering

College of Engineering, Syracuse University

Industry Collaboration Intern

  1. What have you learned from your work at SyracuseCoE?
    I find funding opportunities and perform data processing work at CoE. I have learned time management skills and how to work with minute details at CoE.
  2. What about SyracuseCoE attracts you most?
    The work culture at CoE is very warm, welcoming and friendly. They encourage you to help out with each project and to learn new skills through this process. It’s a great place to work.

Deb McGlynn

Master of Science, Chemistry Department, 2017

State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry

Innovation Programs Intern

 

  1. What did you learn through your internship at SyracuseCoE?
    I found funding opportunities for partner companies. This was very helpful in finding funding opportunities for my own lab.
  2. What was the best part of your experience?
    The people at SyracuseCoE are fantastic. Everyone is very nice and helpful. It is not very often that you find a work environment like the one at SyracuseCoE.
  3. How do you envision your future career?
    I am currently in a Ph.D. program in Civil and Environmental Engineering at Virginia Tech. I hope to work in an industry setting and to be using my degree to assist in air quality management.

Dana Matuson

Bachelor of Science, Newspaper and Online Journalism, 2018

S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, Syracuse University

Communications Intern

  1. What has been the best part of your experience?
    To be the best possible journalism student I can be, I try to make myself well-versed in subjects and areas I’m not familiar with; however, there’s only so much you can learn by solely reading. The best part of my time here at CoE would thus, without a doubt, have to be exposure. Having the opportunity to be surrounded by intellectuals and researchers has allowed me to better understand the amazing work we’re doing here, and has opened my eyes to ideas and work I never thought was possible.
  2. What have you learned so far?
    Because I work with CoE’s social media channels, I’ve learned how to market content to individuals in the scientific field, but also to those who aren’t as familiar with the field; half of the battle of writing a strong article is selling the story. Over the past weeks, I’ve gotten a great grasp on how to create engaging content while maintaining our voice and ideas.
  3. How do you envision your future career?
    I’ve always had a fascination with social media and emerging media, so after graduation I’d love to pursue that field in a corporate communications setting.

Attila Melegh

Bachelor of Science, Aerospace Engineering, 2019

College of Engineering & Computer Science, Syracuse University

Marketing Intern

  1. What do you do at SyracuseCoE?
    Here at the CoE, I am a marketing intern actively involved in the ongoing rebranding efforts and web development initiatives to spread awareness of, revitalize, and attract young entrepreneurs and companies to the SyracuseCoE facilities.
  2. What is something interesting about yourself?
    Currently studying aerospace engineering here at Syracuse University with a physics minor. I enjoy traveling, surfing, skiing, gastronomy, and learning; and I speak four languages with fluency.
  3. What do you hope to do in the future?
    I am developing a software startup set to revolutionize the e-commerce marketplace.

Ryan Milcarek

Ph.D. in Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 2019

Certificate of Advanced Study in Sustainable Enterprise, Certificate in University Teaching, 2017

Researcher in COMER Lab

  1. What projects are you currently working on/researching at SyracuseCoE?
    • Collaborative Research Project 2017 – Institute of Fluid Science – Tohoku University, Title: Micro combustion for clean and efficient syngas formation and fuel cell applications.
    • NEXUS-NY Grant – Cohort 4, Title: Flame-assisted Fuel Cells for micro-CHP, Entrepreneurial Lead
    • National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program (NSF GRFP), Title: Flame-assisted Fuel Cells for micro-Combined Heating and Power
    • Syracuse Center of Excellence (CoE), Title: Reduced NOx RQL Combustor and Flame-assisted Fuel Cell
    • New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), Title: Resilient Residential Boiler/Furnace with Flame-assisted Fuel Cell (RRB FFC)- Currently a big picture of my project is trying to take all of this infrastructure we have that’s combustion-based and try to make it a little bit cleaner, and try to add some additional benefits to it. So we have boilers, hot water heaters, furnaces, they all generate heat, but what if we could actually make them electricity-generating too? That’s kind of the big picture. Power goes out all the time, you lose your hot water, those are different challenges for families, and they can actually create a significant amount of property damage that you’re going to have to pay for. So, the big picture is when we actually take some of this infrastructure and transform it into a fuel cell so you can generate power and you don’t have to worry anymore about power outage.
  2. What lab do you work in and who is the leading faculty member?
    I work in the Combustion and Energy Research (COMER) Lab, which is led by Jeongmin Ahn, Ph.D.
  3. What is the most important thing that you have learned through your research endeavors at SyracuseCoE?
    Collaborate – Projects are always better when individuals from diverse backgrounds work together. I have had the opportunity to work on projects with individuals from the law school, business school, entrepreneurs, industry leaders and many other engineering disciplines. I have gained a great appreciation for their skills and I always look forward to starting new projects with new people.
    Keep trying – Despite working on many grants currently, I have been rejected more times than accepted. I just keep writing and submitting proposals and applications as often as I can.
    Learn something new – I have been put on projects that I did not feel like I had an adequate background to fulfill. I have really come to enjoy the process. Being on an internship and/or in school is the best time to learn a new skill.
  4. How does your research at SyracuseCoE help to advance your academic studies and/or future career path?
    A state-of-the-art facility at the cross roads of excellent academic research and industrial or commercial collaborations/ applications; what more do you need? Its a unique opportunity to work between the two sectors and find your path.
  5. Do you have any advice for other students in your field?
    Choose your priorities carefully and then spend your time on them. We get in trouble when we have good intentions for our priorities, but we don’t put in the time to be successful. We spend our time with our real priorities whether it is school work, an internship, family, Facebook, sports or food.
     

Bryan Morris

Bachelor of Science, Mechanical Engineering, 2016

College of Engineering, Syracuse University

Innovations/Energy Systems Intern

  1. What was the most important thing that you learned through your internship at SyracuseCoE?
    At SyracuseCoE, I learned how important networking is and going the extra mile and simply saying yes to challenging opportunities. Those challenges led me to bigger and better things every single time.
  2. Where are you working now?
    I am a Mechanical Engineer at GE Inspection Technologies in Skaneateles, NY.
  3. Do you have any advice for students in your field?
    Referring back to what I learned at SyracuseCoE, always say yes to opportunities regardless of the difficulty. Even if they don’t pan out you will, at the very least, walk away with a good lesson. Get to know as many people as you can, remember their names, and they will definitely remember yours. A smile and a “Good morning, *Name” will earn you a better reputation than any resume could.

Dastan Pakyari

Master of Science, Energy Systems Engineering, 2016

College of Engineering, Syracuse University

Facilities Intern

  1. What was your role at SyracuseCoE?
    As a Energy Systems Engineer, I primarily worked with the automation of the heating ventilation and building systems, using live data, sensors, programming, and code to make the building operate.
  2. What projects did you work on?
    My capstone project for my Master’s Degree was to use the building’s motion sensors to more efficiently ventilate spaces in the building.
  3. What was the most important thing you learned through your internship at SyracuseCoE?
    The most important thing I learned during my internship was to pay very close attention to details, even the fine details, whether it was writing a report or applying for funding or designing a new system or research experiment. You have to take into account every little detail that there is in order to conduct a thorough analysis.
  4. Do you have any advice for students in your field?
    My advice to students in the engineering field is to really embrace the disciplinary nature of what we do. When you graduate and you go out into the market, you’re not just a civil or mechanical or just an environmental engineer — especially in the building industry — you have to know about other disciplines. You have to know about plumbing code, electric code, you have to really see the whole picture and embrace the fact that you aren’t just an engineer in the one area you studied, but that you’re an engineer in all the areas.
  5. What are your plans for your future career?
    I’d like to be an HVAC engineer. I want to design heating and cooling ventilation systems for high performance commercial and residential buildings.
    .

Rianne Parker

Bachelor of Science, Mechanical Engineering, 2016

College of Engineering, Syracuse University

Facilities Intern

  1. What was the most important thing that you learned through your internship at SyracuseCoE?
    Facilities is a demanding environment which requires quick critical thinking skills. It is hard for me to just pick one thing I learned, but if I were to choose I would say: “Something I learned was that though you may not always know the solution to every problem, it is a necessary skill to know who to call when an issue presents itself. Your help network, whether it be the Physical Plant, a local contracting agency, or your in-house janitorial, is the key to a strong foundation when running any type of facility.”
  2. Where are you working now?
    I am working at SyracuseCoE partner, SRC, Inc., as a Facilities Engineer.
  3. Do you have any advice for students in your field?
    My boss at SyracuseCoE, Paul McCarthy, helped me redefine engineering, with an understanding that thinking critically may not always involve numbers but could actually be as simple as “common sense”. Some solutions can actually be derived from communicating with others over a problem, without involving intense equations or theory. For any emerging engineers trying to find their way into what career path they truly desire, I would encourage, do not forget, that you are more than the numbers and solutions you can produce at the speed of light. Make sure to work on your communication and interpersonal skills, because even engineers have to convince different types of audiences that their work is innovative and transcending in any corporate environment. Even in Facilities.

Garnette Pereira

Master of Science, Information Management, 2016

Syracuse University School of Information Studies

Communications Intern

  1. What was the most important thing that you learned through your internship at SyracuseCoE?
    I think the most important thing that I learned while at my internship was asking for help when needed and always asking for feedback on your work. These two things help improve the quality of your work and help you see things the way from a non-technical person’s eyes as well.
  2. Where are you working now?
    Currently, I am in between jobs. I was interning at SAP America at their Pennsylvania office before.
  3. Do you have any advice for students in your field?
    Never stop learning about all the new technologies that keep getting introduced and try to always stay up-to-date and well-informed. Knowledge never goes to waste.

Weiwen Wang

Master in Science, Public Relations, 2016

S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, Syracuse University

Communications Intern

  1. What was the most important thing that you learned through your internship at SyracuseCoE?
    I worked with Kerrie during my internship at SyracuseCoE. She was a great supervisor who trusted and respected interns and always listened to our opinions and advice. Through working with her, I learned how important it is to speak out my opinions in the workplace.
  2. Where are you working now?
    I am currently interning at PPR Worldwide in New York City.
  3. Do you have any advice for students in your field?
    Don’t be shy about asking questions and speaking out your opinions.

Xuchen Wang

Master of Science, Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, 2017

College of Engineering, Syracuse University

AMTEC 2016 Intern- HealthWay Home Product, Inc.

  1. What was the goal of your internship with HealthWay Home Product, Inc.?
    The goal was to gain precious experience in the U.S. industry, and apply my knowledge to practice.
  2. Did you achieve that goal?
    Yes. I worked on design and analysis at the partner’s company, and I want to do product development.
  3. What was the most important thing you learned through your internship?
    I learned methods to switch between correlated but different projects and how to link these small projects together.
  4. How did your internship help to advance your academic studies and/or future career path?
    My job required a pretty solid background in product design, manufacturing and simulation. It pushed me to review mechanical designs and learn finite element analysis.
  5. How do you envision your future career?
    I’d like to participate in different projects that help in product development works, probably a project manager.
  6. Do you have any advice for future interns?
    Try the SyracuseCoE internship program. It helps build up your knowledge and allows you to apply this is in a practical way.

Zijun Ye

Master of Science, Public Relations, 2017

S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, Syracuse University

Communications Intern

  1. What was the most important thing that you learned through your internship?
    The most important thing that I learned is that we need to make full preparation for each event, including news release production, news release distribution, and graphic design. There are many details we need to pay attention to.
  2. What about SyracuseCoE attracted you most?
    The work environment. I felt really comfortable working there. At SyracuseCoE, I could express myself and communicate with others in a fair way. As an international student coming from China, it was a great thing for me to experience different work environments and to be able to combine what I have learned in school with the real practice.